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Control, Its Loss, and Psychological Reactance

  • Jack W. Brehm

Abstract

Reactance theory was formulated to deal with certain phenomena of social influence (Brehm, 1966; Brehm & Brehm, 1981; Wicklund, 1974). It held that people believe they have specific behavioral freedoms, and when those freedoms are threatened or eliminated in any way, the individual becomes motivated (reactance) to reinstate them.

Keywords

Control Motivation Achievement Motivation Learn Helplessness Psychological Reactance Experimental Social Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

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  • Jack W. Brehm

There are no affiliations available

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