Infertility pp 123-141 | Cite as

The Cervix in Reproduction

  • Gilbert G. HaasJr.
  • Phillip C. Galle
Part of the Clinical Perspectives in Obstetrics and Gynecology book series (CPOG)

Abstract

The uterine cervix must perform the dichotomous role of providing a barrier to unwanted microbiologic invasion while permitting periovulatory penetration of sperm. On the one hand, the cervical mucus must provide a biochemical milieu that is conducive to spermatozoal survival while inhibiting the passage of abnormal or senescent sperm. Similarly, the immune response of the cervix must be prompt in the face of infection, but it must be damped when presented with equally foreign spermatozoal antigens. Cervical factor infertility occurs when this delicate functional balance goes awry.

Keywords

Corticosteroid Immobilization Glucocorticoid Progesterone Oestradiol 

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilbert G. HaasJr.
  • Phillip C. Galle

There are no affiliations available

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