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Schematic Bases of Belief Change

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Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

It is a truism of human existence that people are seldom open-minded. We approach new situations and people, bringing to bear all our past experiences, knowledge, beliefs, and feelings about similar situations and people. For example, we go to a sporting event with a wealth of knowledge about the game, the players’ positions, and individual plays. That knowledge, which may have been gained through direct experience or secondhand sources, provides us with a variety of expectations about what will happen, who will be there, and what they will be like. It also guides our attention and interpretations of information while we are at the event and our memory of it after we leave.

Keywords

Schema Change Belief Change Experimental Social Psychology Social Schema Person Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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