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Laryngeal Gestures in Speech Production

  • Masayuki Sawashima
  • Hajime Hirose

Abstract

This chapter describes the physiological mechanisms of laryngeal gestures for various phonetic distinctions in speech production. An orientation toward the basic laryngeal gestures is presented in Section II, and detailed experimental data are discussed in Section III.

Keywords

Vocal Fold Speech Production Arytenoid Cartilage Cricothyroid Muscle Vocal Fold Vibration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masayuki Sawashima
  • Hajime Hirose

There are no affiliations available

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