The Role of Mathematics in Science as Exemplified by the Work of the Bernoullis and Euler (1979, 1981)

  • C. Truesdell

Abstract

The flight of man in space is the most astonishing achievement of engineering. Many factors were necessary to it. Everybody konws that one was numerical calculation on large machines. Another was the basic equations that the machines were told to solve, thousands and perhaps millions of times. The equations that govern the motion of a space capsule were discovered by mathematicians more than 200 years ago. Machines and methods of using them change often. The basic equations do not. They are permanent.

Keywords

Explosive Gravel Conglomerate Defend Acoustics 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Truesdell
    • 1
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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