Special Needs of Women in Health Examinations

  • Donna Morrison
  • Carmen Moynehan
  • Stanley P. deLisser
  • William Wanago
Part of the Industry and Health Care book series (SSIND, volume 8)

Abstract

The present system of periodic health examinations does not adequately provide for female needs. A number of facts support this view. First, in the United States today, only 9.8 percent of all physicians are female, and of these, relatively few are in teaching positions. Medical textbooks published quite recently continue to describe women as passive, willing to suffer, self-sacrificing, and masochistic.1 There is a general attitude among medical care providers that women are not able to make intelligent choices about treatment. Second, a survey by Executive Health Examiners (EHE) in 1975 found that 20 percent of the women interviewed felt that a periodic pelvic examination and Pap smear constituted an adequate check-up.

Keywords

Cholesterol Microwave Income Expense Boiling 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    E.g., J. R. Willson, C. T. Beecham, and E. R. Carrington, Obstetrics and Gynecology, 4th ed. ( St. Louis: Mosby, 1971 ).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Dillon and J. Seasholtz, “Oral Contraceptives and Myocardial Infarction,” Cardiovascular Nursing 15 (March—April 1979 ): 5–9.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Source Book of Health Insurance Data, 1977–1978 (Washington, D.C.: Health Insurance Institute).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donna Morrison
  • Carmen Moynehan
  • Stanley P. deLisser
  • William Wanago

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations