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Neurohypophyseal Hormones: Old and New Slants on the Relationship of Chemical Structure to Biological Activity

  • Irving L. Schwartz

Abstract

Study of the relationship between the chemical structure and the biological activity of hormones has long been recognized as a valid approach to the elucidation of that initial chemical interplay between hormone and responsive cell which constitutes the primary step in hormone action. It would of course be desirable also to know the sequence and detailed nature of all other events leading to and including the final effector process for each of the final physiological effects of a given hormone on each of its target tissues. However, a thorough understanding of even the initial event in hormone action requires that structure-activity analysis be carried to the conformational level, and, indeed, work directed to this goal is under way (Walter et al. 1971). Nevertheless, the approach to the study of peptide hormone-receptor interaction at the three-dimensional (topochemical) level of structure must be regarded as derivative from antecedent classical structure-activity studies—for it is the primary structure of both hormone and receptor that determines the conformation of the active hormone-receptor complex.

Keywords

Hormone Action Intrinsic Activity Toad Bladder Neurohypophyseal Hormone Carboxamide Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irving L. Schwartz
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsMount Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Brookhaven National LaboratoryMedical Research CenterNew YorkUSA

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