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Oscillographs

  • Galen W. Ewing
  • Harry A. Ashworth
Part of the Laboratory Instrumentation and Techniques book series (LIT, volume 1)

Abstract

Analog recorders designed to accept signals that change more rapidly than a servo system can handle are known as oscillographs. The name presumably has derived from analogy with the cathode-ray oscilloscope, which is also suited for high-speed signals; indeed, much higher frequency signals can be displayed on an oscilloscope than on any recorder with moving parts. Most oscillographs fall into one of two classes: those that use photographic recording, and those that rely on pen-and-ink, electrical, or thermal writing methods. Figure 5-1 shows a representative style of multichannel oscillograph.

Keywords

Room Light Recording Paper High Frequency Signal Laboratory Record Mass Spectrogram 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Galen W. Ewing
    • 1
  • Harry A. Ashworth
    • 1
  1. 1.Seton Hall UniversitySouth OrangeUSA

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