Oscillographs

  • Galen W. Ewing
  • Harry A. Ashworth
Part of the Laboratory Instrumentation and Techniques book series (LIT, volume 1)

Abstract

Analog recorders designed to accept signals that change more rapidly than a servo system can handle are known as oscillographs. The name presumably has derived from analogy with the cathode-ray oscilloscope, which is also suited for high-speed signals; indeed, much higher frequency signals can be displayed on an oscilloscope than on any recorder with moving parts. Most oscillographs fall into one of two classes: those that use photographic recording, and those that rely on pen-and-ink, electrical, or thermal writing methods. Figure 5-1 shows a representative style of multichannel oscillograph.

Keywords

Zinc Quartz Mercury Helium Eter 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Galen W. Ewing
    • 1
  • Harry A. Ashworth
    • 1
  1. 1.Seton Hall UniversitySouth OrangeUSA

Personalised recommendations