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Infrared-Microwave Double Resonance

Chapter

Abstract

Since the double resonance effect in molecules was first observed in 1955 with an ammonia-beam maser at 24 GHz, it has been investigated as a tool for microwave and radiofrequency spectroscopy. The recent development of infrared lasers has made the infrared- microwave double resonance experiment feasible by using the vibration-rotation transitions in molecules. Previous works on double resonance were reviewed1 in 1971, and they are not shown in this paper.

Keywords

Double Resonance Triple Resonance Microwave Spectroscopy Microwave Transition Infrared Transition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of TokyoTokyo 113Japan
  2. 2.Institute of Physical and Chemical ResearchWako 351Japan

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