Acoustics

  • B. P. Hildebrand
  • B. B. Brenden

Abstract

The term acoustics covers a broad range of subjects, many of which need not be considered in this book. Among those subjects not covered are architectural acoustics, communication acoustics, noise and vibration analysis, music, techniques for measuring elastic constants of solid materials, techniques for studying nonisotropic stresses and inhomogeneities, and measurements of molecular structure of organic liquids.

Keywords

Refraction Compressibility Acoustics 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. P. Hildebrand
    • 1
  • B. B. Brenden
    • 2
  1. 1.Pacific Northwest LaboratoriesBattelle Memorial InstituteRichlandUSA
  2. 2.Holosonics, Inc.RichlandUSA

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