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Measurement and Detection of X-Rays

  • J. G. Brown

Abstract

In any application or study of X-rays some method of detection of the X-ray beam will be required. It may be sufficient to detect the existence of a beam or to record its position relative to the incident beam or to some other reference. In such cases qualitative methods are acceptable. On the other hand it may be necessary to know the intensity of the beam either relative to the intensity of other beams or in absolute measure, or again it may be necessary to know the total energy received in the form of X-rays by some object. In such cases, of course, quantitative methods are required.

Keywords

Zinc Sulphide Proportional Counter Metallic Silver Silver Halide Straight Line Portion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Genearl

  1. Sharpe, Nuclear Radiation Detectors, Methuen (1955).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© J. G. Brown 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. G. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Royal College of Advanced TechnologySalfordUK

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