A summary of, and inferences from the macro- and micro-analysis of residential water consumption

  • P. Darr
  • S. L. Feldman
  • Ch. Kamen
Part of the Studies in applied regional science book series (SARS, volume 6)

Abstract

At the beginning of this analysis of residential water use, it was shown that investment in water supply at the municipal level is a matter of some importance in Israel. Approximately 20% of the total investment, in the water economy, if distribution systems within municipalities are included, involves the urban sector. An estimation of such costs over the past twenty-five years would be difficult because of unrealistic accounting procedures, but future investment horizons may be used as guidelines. From 1975–1985, an additional IL 100 per capita would not be an unusually high estimate (including distribution within the towns) for additions of new capacity.1 This figure would quadruple if it were applied to each new resident of the State of Israel for the same time period. In addition, this cost may be compounded in the future because of an unexpected backlog of deficiences in capacity design, especially with regard to the little-explored area of peak loads. The compounding effect is meliorated since increased sprinkling loads, subsidies to sprinkling, higher income, and low water prices for within house consumption are all factors which have not been previously accounted for in estimating the demand for water.

Keywords

Income Stratification Resi Univer Flushing 

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Notes

  1. 5.
    See, for example, Feldman (1975a, 1975b, 1972a, 1972b).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© H.E. Stenfert Kroese B.V., Leiden 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Darr
    • 1
  • S. L. Feldman
    • 2
  • Ch. Kamen
    • 3
  1. 1.Tahal-Water Planning for IsraelIsrael
  2. 2.Clark UniversityUSA
  3. 3.University of HaifaIsrael

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