Chemotherapy pp 129-147 | Cite as

The Activity of New Drugs Against Mouse Tumours

  • John M. Venditti
  • Mary K. Wolpert-DeFilippes

Abstract

In 1974, more than 39,000 synthetic compounds and 8,000 crude natural product extracts were submitted to the National Cancer Institute for evaluation of their antitumour activity in laboratory models. For more than 75% of the synthetic materials, the amount received was 2.0 g. or less. Testing of a large number of new materials available in limited quantity requires the use of an initial biological screen which is rapid, reproducible, inexpensive and above all, predictive for clinical utility.

Keywords

Leukemia Folate Streptomyces Bark Epoxide 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Venditti
    • 1
  • Mary K. Wolpert-DeFilippes
    • 1
  1. 1.Drug Evaluation Branch Drug Research and Development Division of Cancer TreatmentNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA

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