Lymphatics

  • M. Tsuchiya
  • H. Asakura
  • N. Hibi
  • Y. Watanabe
  • Y. Enomoto
  • P. G. Forkert
  • J. W. Davidson
  • Barry B. Hobbs
  • John B. Hay
  • J. L. Atkins
  • C. C. C. O’Morchoe
  • G. G. Pinter
  • J. W. Quin
  • A. D. Shannon
  • F. C. Courtice
  • Norman B. Ackerman
  • Maximo Deysine
  • Milan Mader
  • Eliseo Rosario
  • Arthur H. AufsesJr.
  • William P. Maher
Chapter

Abstract

We (Tsuchiya et al., 1973) have reported that the lymphangiectasia of the small intestine was revealed not only in protein-losing enteropathy but also in liver cirrhosis and Behçet’s disease. Although lymphangiectasia of the small intestine does not necessarily cause enteric protein loss, what mechanism does trigger this loss?

Keywords

Catheter Albumin Germinal Barium Angiotensin 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

Reference

  1. Tsuchiya M., Asakura H., Shimabukuro K., Morita A., Morishita T., Watanabe Y., and Enomoto Y., 1973, Lymphangiectasia of the small intestine, Bibl. Anat. 11:317.PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. Davidson J. W., Fletch A. L., McIlmoyle G., and Roeck W., 1973, The technique and applications of lymphography, Can. J. Comp. Med.37:(2):130.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Davidson J. W., Hobbs B. B., and Fletch A. L., 1974, The microcirculatory unit of the mammalian lymph node, in: Proceedings of the VIM European Congress on Microcirculation, Karger, Basel.Google Scholar
  3. Denz F. A., 1947, Age changes in lymph nodes, J. Pathol. Bacteriol. 59:575.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Fukuda J., 1968, Studies on the vascular architecture and the fluid exchange in the rabbit popliteal lymph node, Keio J. Med. 17:53.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Herman P. G., Yamamoto I., and Mellins H. J., 1972, Blood microcirculation in the lymph node during the primary immune response, J. Exp. Med. 136:697.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Millikin P. D., 1966, Anatomy of germinal centres in human lymphoid tissue, J. Arch. Pathol. 82:499.Google Scholar

Reference

  1. Hall J. G., and Morris B., 1965, The origin of the cells in the efferent lymph from a single node, J. Exp. Med. 121:901.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. Beh, K. J., Watson, D. L., and Lascelles, A. K., 1974, Concentrations of immunoglobulins and albumin in lymph collected from various regions of the body of the sheep, Aust. J. Exp. Biol. Med. Sci. 52:81.Google Scholar
  2. Osogoe B., and Courtice F. C., 1968, The effects of occlusion of the blood supply to the popliteal lymph node of the rabbit on the cell and protein content of the lymph and on the histology of the node, Aust. J. Exp. Biol. Med. Sci. 46:515.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Quin J. W., and Lascelles A. K., 1975, Relationship between the recirculation of lymphocytes and protein concentration of lymph in sheep, Aust. J. Exp. Biol. Med. Sci. 53:1.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Quin J. W., and Shannon A. D., 1975, High concentration of bilirubin in post-nodal lymph associated with red blood cell catabolism in lymph nodes of the sheep, Lymphology (submitted).Google Scholar
  5. Roberts J. C., and Courtice F. C., 1969, Measurements of protein leakage in the acute and recovery stages of a thermal injury, Aust. J. Exp. Biol. Med. Sci. 47:421.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. Ackerman N. B., 1973, Vascular influences on intestinal lymph flow and their relationship to operation for carcinoma of the intestine, Surg. Gynecol. Obstet. 137:801. Szwed, J. J., Kleit, S. A., and Hamburger, R. J., 1972, Effect of furosemide and chlorothiazide on the thoracic duct lymph flow in the dog, J. Lab. Clin. Med. 79:693.Google Scholar
  2. Turnbull R. B., Jr., Kyle K., Watson F. R., and Sprath J., 1967, Cancer of the colon, Ann. Surg. 166:420.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. Maher W. P., and Swindle P. F., 1966, Blood and lymph vessels of the tongue of dog and man, Anat. Rec. 154:503.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Tsuchiya
    • 3
  • H. Asakura
    • 3
  • N. Hibi
    • 3
  • Y. Watanabe
    • 4
  • Y. Enomoto
    • 4
  • P. G. Forkert
    • 5
  • J. W. Davidson
    • 6
  • Barry B. Hobbs
    • 7
  • John B. Hay
    • 7
  • J. L. Atkins
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. C. C. O’Morchoe
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. G. Pinter
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. W. Quin
    • 8
  • A. D. Shannon
    • 8
  • F. C. Courtice
    • 8
  • Norman B. Ackerman
    • 9
    • 10
  • Maximo Deysine
    • 11
    • 12
  • Milan Mader
    • 11
    • 12
  • Eliseo Rosario
    • 11
    • 12
  • Arthur H. AufsesJr.
    • 11
    • 12
  • William P. Maher
    • 13
    • 14
  1. 1.Department of Physiology, University of MarylandSchool of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Anatomy, Loyola UniversityStritch School of MedicineChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Internal MedicineKeio UniversityTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of PathologyKeio UniversityTokyoJapan
  5. 5.Department of AnatomyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  6. 6.McMaster University Medical CenterHamiltonCanada
  7. 7.Division of Experimental Pathology, Departments of Radiology and Pathology, and Institute of Immunology, Medical Sciences BuildingUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  8. 8.Department of Experimental Pathology, John Curtin School of Medical ResearchAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  9. 9.Department of Surgery, SUNYUpstate Medical CenterSyracuseUSA
  10. 10.Veterans HospitalSyracuseUSA
  11. 11.Department of SurgeryLong Island Jewish-Hillside Medical CenterNew Hyde ParkUSA
  12. 12.The Health Sciences CenterThe State University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA
  13. 13.Department of AnatomyThe Medical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA
  14. 14.Marquette UniversityMilwaukeeUSA

Personalised recommendations