Acceleration of Ethanol Metabolism by High Ethanol Concentrations and Chronic Ethanol Consumption: Role of the Microsomal Ethanol Oxidizing System (MEOS)

  • Shohei Matsuzaki
  • R. Teschke
  • K. Ohnishi
  • C. S. Lieber

Abstract

Chronic ethanol consumption has been shown to be associated with an acceleration of ethanol metabolism in man (1–3) and rats (4–6). This phenomenon could not be explained by the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase itself, as reviewed elsewhere (7). Some other possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the adaptive increase of the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) (5, 8, 9), increased mitochondrial reoxidation of NADH (10–12) and enhanced catalase-H2O2 mediated peroxidation (13, 14).

Keywords

Respiration Fructose Mannitol Succinate Fibrinogen 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shohei Matsuzaki
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Teschke
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Ohnishi
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. S. Lieber
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Liver Disease, Nutrition and AlcoholismVeterans Administration HospitalBronxUSA
  2. 2.Mount Sinai School of MedicineCity University of New York (CUNY)USA

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