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Polycyclic Hydrocarbon Epoxides as Active Metabolic Intermediates

  • Peter Sims

Abstract

Many chemical carcinogens, including the polycyclic hydrocarbons, require metabolic activation before they can react with cellular macromolecules and probably before they can exert their biological effects (1). With the polycyclic hydrocarbons, this activation is carried out by both human and animal tissues, and the intermediates thus formed are believed to be epoxides (2). In this chapter, the overall metabolic pathways by which different types of epoxides are formed from polycyclic hydrocarbons, the routes by which these epoxides are further metabolized, and the structures of the epoxides that react with glutathione and probably with DNA in cells are considered.

Keywords

Embryo Cell Active Intermediate Glutathione Conjugate Polycyclic Hydrocarbon Mouse Embryo Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Sims
    • 1
  1. 1.Chester Beatty Research Institute Institute of Cancer ResearchRoyal Cancer HospitalLondonUK

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