Textured Titanium Technology

  • F. R. Larson
  • A. Zarkades

Abstract

Investigations have been concluded which indicate that a new generation of materials with greatly improved and consistent properties can be provided through controlled crystallographic preferred orientation. This adds a third dimension to alloy development along with composition and microstructure. Titanium alloys were examined for crystallographic preferred orientation and its effect on the elastic and plastic properties. Material characteristics studies include fatigue, toughness, stress-corrosion cracking, and creep-stress rupture. Results indicate that proper selection and control of texture will allow increased structural efficiency because current design allowances reflect the low material properties obtained in titanium when texturing is not taken into account. The utilization of texture for property improvement will increase as quantitative data on the subject become available, and when a greater appreciation of this phenomenon is inculcated among designers and materials application people.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. R. Larson
    • 1
  • A. Zarkades
    • 1
  1. 1.Army Materials and Mechanics Research CenterWatertownUSA

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