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O2 Sensitive, Local Regulation of CSF H+ Activity

  • H. Makhzoumi
  • R. J. Traystman
  • R. S. Fitzgerald
  • B. Burns
  • G. H. Gurtner
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 99)

Abstract

It has been known for many years that the H+ activity of the CSF was somehow protected from acidosis occurring in the blood and that this protection was partially achieved by a mechanism which could cause HCO 3 - differences between CSF and blood.

Keywords

Metabolic Acidosis Acidosis Hypercapnia Excess Flux HC03 Level Hypoxic Mixture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Makhzoumi
    • 1
  • R. J. Traystman
    • 1
  • R. S. Fitzgerald
    • 1
  • B. Burns
    • 1
  • G. H. Gurtner
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Hygiene and Public HealthThe Johns Hopkins UniversityMarylandUK

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