Comparative aspects of acrosomal formation

  • Jerome S. Kaye
Part of the Electron Microscopy in Biology and Medicine book series (EMBM, volume 2)

Abstract

The acrosome is an organelle which is attached to the anterior part of the nucleus of animal sperm and forms the apical body of the sperm. It contains enzymes which lyse the oocyte membranes to permit entry of the sperm for fertilization. In some marine sperm the acrosome also ejects a filament which makes the initial contact of the sperm with the egg. Acrosome structure (1), and evolution (2), have been carefully reviewed recently, as well as aspects of acrosome formation and physiology (3).

Keywords

Formalin Migration Hydration Saccharide Polysaccharide 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston, The Hague, Dordrecht, Lancaster 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerome S. Kaye
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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