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Biology and Chemosensitivity of Clonogenic, Human Melanoma Tumor Cells

  • Frank L. MeyskensJr.
  • Stephen P. Thomson
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 21)

Abstract

The biology and chemosensitivity of most human tumors has been largely inferred from clinical experience or the study of established tumor cell lines. Until recently, experimental investigations of human tumors have largely been confined to kinetic studies, and except in a few cases, to hematopoietic tumors. The foundation for current advances in the biology of human tumor stem cells was established in the early 1960’s by Till and McCulloch and their colleagues with the development of spleen-colony assays as a method to grow and identify hematopoietic stem cells [1, 2]. A particularly important demonstration was that cells which gave rise to spleen colonies were closely related to cells which grew in semisolid medium in vitro under anchorage-independent conditions [3]. A number of investigators subsequently used this in vitro methodology to grow hematopoietic progenitor cells from murine and human sources [4, 5]. Park et al. [6] and Buick et al. [7] reported the growth of human leukemic cells in semisolid culture; chemosensitivity of the clonogenic cells was also studied [8] and self-renewal of the colony-forming cells demonstrated [9].

Keywords

Melanoma Cell Human Melanoma Clonogenic Assay Cloning Efficiency Primary Coloni 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Boston 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank L. MeyskensJr.
  • Stephen P. Thomson

There are no affiliations available

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