Disorders of Potassium Metabolism

  • Jerome P. Kassirer
  • Jay B. Wish

Abstract

Hypokalemia and potassium deficiency are frequently encountered, and their consequences are sufficiently serious to merit prompt and effective diagnosis and management. Potassium is lost from the gastrointestinal tract as a result of diarrhea, vomiting, and external drainage of various fluids; it is lost from the kidney in many disease entities and by the action of a large number of diuretics. In certain circumstances, hypokalemia appears in the absence of potassium depletion.

Keywords

Arginine Prostaglandin Propranolol Digoxin Renin 

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© Martinus Nijhoff Publishing, Boston/ The Hague/ Dordrecht/ Lancaster 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerome P. Kassirer
  • Jay B. Wish

There are no affiliations available

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