An Introduction to Picosecond Spectroscopy

  • Alfred Laubereau

Abstract

Intense laser pulses with a time duration of several 10−12 s were first observed in 1966.1 It was immediately recognized by investigators in the field that these picosecond light pulses would allow direct investigations of ultrafast molecular processes in condensed phases. In fact, the first application of these pulses to a study of radiationless transitions of dye molecules was reported soon after.2 Numerous investigations were conducted by several laboratories on a wide variety of problems in recent years.3 Considerable effort has been spent on the reproducible generation of well-defined pulses. As a result, quantitative investigations can be carried out on the time scale of picoseconds and subpicoseconds with carefully analysed pulses.

Keywords

Light Pulse Stimulate Raman Scattering Probe Pulse Picosecond Pulse Nonlinear Absorber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfred Laubereau
    • 1
  1. 1.Physikalisches InstitutUniversität BayreuthBayreuthW. Germany

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