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Sociocultural Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease

  • S. Leonard Syme
  • Teresa E. Seeman

Abstract

During the last thirty years, research evidence has accumulated regarding the role of sociocultural factors in the etiology of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. While this research evidence is now vast in quantity, it is also variable in quality. Nevertheless, an impressive set of relatively consistent findings has now emerged in this field. The purpose of this paper is to review and summarize this evidence.

Keywords

Coronary Heart Disease Behavior Pattern Stressful Life Event Framingham Study Psychosomatic Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Leonard Syme
    • 1
  • Teresa E. Seeman
  1. 1.Department of Biomedical and Environmental Health SciencesSchool of Public Health, University of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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