Advertisement

Molecular Ions pp 517-562 | Cite as

Comparative Study of the Reactivity of Gaseous Ions in Selected Internal Energy States by Using a Tandem and a Triple Mass Spectrometer

  • Imre Szabo

Abstract

Much of our knowledge of the structure, energetics, and other physical and chemical properties of molecular and fragment ions derives from the study of the various ways in which electromagnetic radiation and atomic particles can interact with matter. An interaction or a reaction implies that the reactants are transformed into final products, as a result of exchange of energy and particles between them. For a complete understanding of a particular interaction, we need to know the structure and energetics of the reactants, intermediate products, and final products involved.

Keywords

Reaction Chamber Tandem Mass Spectrometer Recombination Energy Relative Kinetic Energy Photon Impact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. B. Hasted, Physics of Atomic Collisions, Butterworths, London (1972).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    L. G. Christophorou, Atomic and Molecular Radiation Physics, Wiley-Interscience, London (1971).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    J. Berkowitz, Photoabsorption, Photoionization, and Photoelec- tron Spectroscopy, Academic Press, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. R. West, ed., “Molecular Spectroscopy,” Heyden & Son, London (1977).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    P. Ausloos, ed., Interaction between Ions and Molecules, Plenum Press, New York (1975).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    P. Ausloos, ed., Kinetics of Ion-Molecule Reactions, Plenum Press, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    M. T. Bowers, ed., Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Vols. 1 and 2, Academic Press, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    E. Lindholm, in: “Ion-Molecule Reactions,” J. L. Franklin, ed., Plenum Press, New York (1972), Vol. 2, p. 457.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    I. Szabo, Arkiv Fysik, 31, 287 (1966).Google Scholar
  10. 1O.
    I. Szabo, in: “Advances in Mass Spectrometry,” Vol. 7A, N. R. Daly, ed., Heyden & Son, London (1978), p. 258.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    I. Szabo, “Experimental determination of rate constants for consecutive ion molecule reactions,” in: “Advances in Mass Spectromety,” Vol. 8, A. Quayle, ed., Heyden & Son, London, (1980), p. 194.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    I. Szabo, Arkiv Fysik, 33, 57 (1966).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    I. Szabo, Arkiv Fysik, 35, 339 (1967).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 2, 103 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 3, 169 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    I. Szabo and P J. Derrick, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics 7, 55 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    P. J. Derrick and I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 7, 71 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    W. Forst, “Theory of Unimolecular Reactions,” Academic Press, New York (1973).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    K. Levsen, “Fundamental Aspects of Organic Mass Spectrometry,” Progress in Mass Spectrometry, Vol. 4, Verlag Chemie, Weinheim (1978).Google Scholar
  20. 2O.
    J. W. Rabalais, “Principles of Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spec-troscopy,” Wiley-Interscience, New York (1977).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    J. Sunner and I. Szabo, in: “Advances in Mass Spectrometry,” Vol. 7B, N. R. Daly, ed., Heyden & Son, London (1978), p. 1383.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    I. Koyano, “Ion-Molecule Reactions,” in: “Comprehensive Chemical Kinetics”, C. H. Bamford and C. F. H. Tipper, eds., Elsevier, Amsterdam (1976), p. 293.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    J. B. Laudenslager, W. T. Huntress, Jr., M. T. Bowers, J. Chem. Phys., 61, 4600 (1974).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    P. Ausloos, J. R. Eyler, and S. G. Lias, Chem. Phys. Lett., 30, 21 (1975).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    M. Chau and M. T. Bowers, Chem. Phys. Lett., 44, 490 (1976).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    V. G. Anicich, J. B. Laudenslager, W. T. Huntress, Jr., and J. H. Futrell, J. Chem. Phys., 67, 4340 (1977).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    E. W. Kaiser, A. Crowe, and W. E. Falconer, J. Chem. Phys., 61, 2720 (1974).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    C. E. Klots, D. M. Mintz, and T. Baer, J. Chem. Phys., 6£, 5100 (1977).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    T. Baer, “State selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence,” in: Ref. [7], Vol. 1, p. 153.Google Scholar
  30. 3O.
    K. E. McCulloh, T. E. Sharp, and H. M. Rosenstock, J. Chem. Phys., 42, 3501 (1965).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    A. Giardini-Guidoni, G. Missoni, R. Camilloni, and G. Stefani, in: “Advances in Mass Spectrometry,” Vol. 7A, N. R. Daly, ed., Heyden & Son, London (1978), p. 175.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    D. W. Turner, C. Baker, A. D. Baker, and C. R. Bundle, “Molecular Photoelectron Spectrosopy,” Wiley-Interscience, New York (1970).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    B. Brehm and E. von Puttkammer, Z. Naturforsch., Teil A, 22, 8 (1967).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    R. Stockbauer, J. Chem. Phys., 70, 2108 (1979).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    R. C. Dunbar, “Ion photodissociation,” in: Ref. [7], Vol. 2, p. 181.Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    J. P. Maier, “Decay processes of the lowest excited electronic states of polyatomic radical cations,” in: Ref. [6], p. 437.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    E. Lindholm, in: “Ion-Molecule Reactions in the Gas Phase,” Advances in Chemistry, Series, No. 58, R. F. Gould, ed., American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1966), p. 1.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    J. H. Futrell and T. O. Tiernan, in: “Ion-Molecule Reactions,” J. L. Franklin, ed., Vol. 2, Plenum Press, New York (1972), p. 485.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    S. Ikuta, K. Yoshihara, and T. Shiokawa, Bull. Chem. Soc. Japan Japan, 49, 66 (1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 4O.
    A. Henglein, in: “Molecular Beams and Reaction Kinetics,: Proceedings of the International School of Physics Enrico Fermi,” C. Schlier, ed., Academic Press, New York (1970), p. 139.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    G. Eisele, A. Henglein, and G. Bosse, Ber. Bunseriges. Phys. Chem., 78, 140 (1974).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    A. Henglein, in: “Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gases,” Advances in Chemistry Series, No. 58, R. F. Gould, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1966), p. 63.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Z. Herman and R. Wolfgang, in: “Ion-Molecule Reactions,” J. L. Franklin, ed., Plenum Press, New York, Vol. 2 (1972), p. 553.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    W. R. Gentry, “Molecular Beam Studies of Ion-Molecule Reactions,” in: Ref. [6], p. 81.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    W. R. Gentry, “Molecular Beam Techniques: Applications to the Study of Ion-Molecule Reactions,” in: Ref [7], Vol. 2, p. 221.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    J. L. Franklin, ed., “Ion-Molecule Reactions, Part I, Kinetics and Dynamics,” Benchmark Papers in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics 13. Dowden, Hutchinson & Ross, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania (1979).Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    JL Franlin, ed., “Ion-Molecule Reactions, Part I, Kinetics and Dynamics,” Benchmark Papers in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics 13. Dowden, Hutchinson & Ross, Stroudsburg Pennylvania (1979).Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    A. Giardini-Guidoni, and L. Friedman, J. Chem. Phys., 45, 937 (1966).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    J. H. Futrell and F. P. Abramson, in: “Ion-Molecule Reactions in the Gas Phase,” Advances in Chemistry, Series No. 58, R. F. Gould, ed., American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1966), p. 107.Google Scholar
  50. 5O.
    T. Su and M. T. Bowers, “Classical ion-molecule collision theory,” in: Ref. [7], Vol. 1, p. 83.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    K. M. Refay and W. A. Chupka, J. Chem. Phys., 43, 2544 (1965).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    P. M. Hierl, V. Pacak, and Z. Herman, J. Chem. Phys., £7, 2678 (1977).Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    E. Lindeman, L. C. Frees, R. W. Rozett, and W. S. Koski, J. Chem. Phys., 56, 1003 (1972).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    D. L. Albritton, “Energy Dependences of Ion-Neutral Reactions Studied in Drift Tubes,” in: Ref. [6], p. 119.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    I. Szabo and C. Hägg, to be submitted for pulbication in the Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics.Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    J. E. Mbnahan and H. E. Stanton, J. Chem. Phys., 37, 2654 (1963).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. 57.
    T. O. Tiernan, “Reactions of Negative Ions,” in: Ref. [5], p. 353.Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    J. Sunner and I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 25, 241 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. 59.
    J. Sunner and I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 215, 263 (1977).Google Scholar
  60. 6O.
    J. Sunner, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 32, 285 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    T. O. Tiernan and J. H. Futrell, J. Phys. Chem., TL, 3080 (1968).Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    T. Nagatani, K. Yoshihara, and T. Shiokawa, Bull. Chem. Soc. Japan, 46, 1628 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. 63.
    I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 3 103 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. 64.
    I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 169 (1969).Google Scholar
  65. 65.
    I. Szabo, will be submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    J. Sunner and I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 31, 193 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. 67.
    J. Sunner and I. Szabo, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Physics, 31, 213 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. 68.
    R. G. Cooks, ed., Collision Spectroscopy, Plenum Press, New York (1978).Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    I. Szabo, Physics Lett., 24A, 702 (1967).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. 7O.
    H. von Koch, Arkiv Fysik, 28, 529 (1965).Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    E. Lindholm, C. Fridh, and L. Äsbrink, Faraday Discussions of the Chemical Society, 54, 127 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. 72.
    E. Lindholm, Arkiv Fysik, 37, 37 (1967).Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    C. Galloy and J. C. Lorquet, Chemical Physics, 30, 169 (1978).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. 74.
    R. G. Bennet and E. W. Dalby, J. Chem. Phys., 32, 1111 (I960).Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    R. P. Schwenker, J. Chem. Phys., 1895 (1965).Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    E. Lindholm, I. Szabo, and P. Wilmenius, Arkiv Fysik, 15, 417 (1963).Google Scholar
  77. 77.
    D. W. Turner, C. Baker, A. D. Baker, and C. R. Brundle, Molecular Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Wiley Interscience, New York (1970).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Imre Szabo
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Physical Chemistry 2 Chemical CenterThe Lund Institute of TechnologyLund 7Sweden

Personalised recommendations