The American Divorce Rate

What Does It Mean? What Should We Worry About?
  • Mary Jo Bane

Abstract

THE INDICATORS. The basic fact about the American divorce rate is that it is rising. The number of divorces per 1,000 married women has risen annually since 1960. Before that annual divorce rates fell somewhat during the late 1930s, rose to a sharp peak after World War II, and fell until the late 1950s. In 1977, the most recent year for which final divorce statistics have been published, 1,091,000 divorces were granted, 21.1 per 1,000 married women. Figure 1 charts the course of the annual divorce rate from 1930 to 1976.

Keywords

Married Woman Divorce Rate Marital Disruption Current Population Report Income Maintenance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Jo Bane
    • 1
  1. 1.John F. Kennedy School of GovernmentHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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