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Changing Sex Roles

College Graduates of the 1960s and 1970s
  • Abigail J. Stewart
  • Patricia Salt

Abstract

Since the women’s movement first began to heighten our awareness of the roles and relative status of men and women, it has become fashionable to monitor—and issue statements about—changes in these roles. Thus we periodically hear that women have made great strides but still have a long was to go. Or we hear that women have gone too far and have lost essential qualities which will leave the culture emptier. Or we hear that women have actually not moved any distance at all—the change is ephemeral, only occurring at the level of rhetoric and trivial outward display, but not at the level of real or significant behavior.

Keywords

Affiliation Motive Life Pattern Retrospective View Female Personality Psychological Androgyny 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abigail J. Stewart
    • 1
  • Patricia Salt
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBoston UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryTufts University New England Medical CenterBostonUSA

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