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American Demographic Directions

  • Nathan Keyfitz

Abstract

For the demographer these are eventful days. All-time records are being established on the basic population variables. For 10 years the American birth rate has been about 15 per 1,000, lower than it had ever been before; the expectation of life, after some hesitation, is rising again, and that of women could well reach 80 years in the near future; legal abortions are near the 1.5-million mark; one-sixth of all births are to unmarried women. In addition to these facts affecting the biological variables of birth and death are changes in social aspects of population: the divorce rate sets a new record each year; women have entered the labor force in unheard-of proportions, and even mothers of young children now take jobs; unconventional living arrangements are widespread.

Keywords

Labor Force Married Woman Divorce Rate Legal Abortion Clerical Worker 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathan Keyfitz
    • 1
  1. 1.John F. Kennedy School of GovernmentHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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