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Determination of Direct-Acting Mutagens and Clastogens in Oil Shale Retort Process Water

  • D. J. Chen
  • L. L. Deaven
  • J. Meyne
  • R. T. Okinaka
  • G. F. Strniste
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 27)

Abstract

Shale oil products contain various metabolically active and photoactive genotoxic components (Strniste and Chen, 1981; Okinaka et al., 1981). In addition, our preliminary observations indicated that retort process water contains direct-acting mutagens that cause significant increases in 6-thioguanine-resistant (6-TGR) mutants in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (Chen et al., 1981). However, we have been unable to demonstrate the occurrence of direct-acting mutagens in these process waters when tested in the standard Ames/Salmonella assay (Nickols and Strniste, 1981). In this report, we present results concerning the dose response of direct-acting mutagenicity in an aboveground retort process (ARP) water and various fractions from it. Since many mutagenic agents are also clastogenic, we have compared the cytogenetic and mutagenic effects of this process water under the same experimental conditions.

Keywords

Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Chinese Hamster Ovary Process Water Alamos National Laboratory Tetraploid Cell 
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References

  1. Chen, D.J., R.T. Okinaka, and G.F. Strniste. 1981. Determination of direct-acting mutagens in shale oil retort process water. In: The Los Alamos Integrated Oil Shale Health and Environmental Program: A Status Report. LA-8665-SR. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Los Alamos, NM. pp. 59–60.Google Scholar
  2. Chen, D.J., and G.F. Strniste. 1982. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of shale oil byproducts, II: comparison of mutagenic effects at five genetic markers induced by retort process water plus near ultraviolet light in CHO cells. Environ. Mutagen.Google Scholar
  3. Deaven, L.L., and A. Nock. 1979. The induction of endoreduplication in Chinese hamster cells following treatment with shale-derived oils. Mamm. Chromosomes Newsletter 20:10.Google Scholar
  4. Nickols, J., and G.F. Strniste. 1981. Ames/Salmonella mutagen assay of oil shale process waters. In: The Los Alamos Integrated Oil Shale Health and Environmental Program: A Status Report. LA-8665-SR. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Los Alamos, NM. pp. 54–57.Google Scholar
  5. Okinaka, R.T., and G.F. Strniste. 1981. Exogenous metabolic activation of process waters in mammalian cell cultures. In: The Los Alamos Integrated Oil Shale Health and Environmental Program: A Status Report. LA-8665-SR. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Los Alamos, NM. pp. 57–59.Google Scholar
  6. Strniste, G.F., and D.J. Chen. 1981. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of shale oil byproducts, I: activation of retort process waters with near ultraviolet light. Environ. Mutagen. 3:221–231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Sutou, S., and F. Tokuyama. 1974. Induction of endoreduplication in cultured mammalian cells by some chemical mutagens. Cancer Res. 34:2615–2623.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Chen
    • 1
  • L. L. Deaven
    • 2
  • J. Meyne
    • 2
  • R. T. Okinaka
    • 1
  • G. F. Strniste
    • 1
  1. 1.Life Sciences Division, Los Alamos National LaboratoryGenetics GroupsLos AlamosUSA
  2. 2.Life Sciences Division, Los Alamos National LaboratoryExperimental Pathology GroupsLos AlamosUSA

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