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Analysis for 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin Residues in Environmental Samples

  • R. L. Harless
  • R. G. Lewis
  • A. E. Dupuy
  • D. D. McDaniel
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 26)

Abstract

Small scale environmental monitoring studies have been conducted to quantitatively determine the presence or absence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) in fish and deer. 2,3,7,8-TCDD was detected in a concentration range of 3 to 42 parts-per-trillion (ppt) in 19 of 20 fish samples collected in the State of Michigan. Two of 27 ppt levels of 2,3,7,8-TCDD were detected in various parts of the bodies of deer which were used in a study conducted in California to determine the effects of an aerial application of 2,4,5-T. Average minimum limits of detection for these analyses were: fish, 3 ppt; deer, 2 ppt. The analytical methodology, criteria for confirmation of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and the results of each study are discussed.

Keywords

Environmental Protection Agency Quality Assurance Program High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Aerial Application Chlorine Isotope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Harless
    • 1
  • R. G. Lewis
    • 1
  • A. E. Dupuy
    • 2
  • D. D. McDaniel
    • 2
  1. 1.Health Effects Research Laboratory (MD-69)U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyUSA
  2. 2.Toxicant Analysis CenterU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyUSA

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