Agency Policy Requirements and System Design

  • William Goldner
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 12)

Abstract

The conventional wisdom about urban modelling systems suggests that their design is directed toward providing constructive guidance to decision-makers in evaluating policy proposals. But this judgement, loaded with linked conditions and qualifying adjectives, needs clarification if it is to serve as a launching pad to the theme of this paper.

Keywords

Transportation Income Sewage Resi Clarification 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Goldner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Governmental StudiesUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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