Affective, Cognitive, and Evaluative Perceptions of Animals

  • Stephen R. Kellert
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 6)

Abstract

The lack of systematic investigation of human perceptions of animals is surprising given the theoretical and practical significance of the topic. The theoretical aspect is suggested by the role that animals have played in diverse aspects of human commerce and communication for as long as such things have been measured. For example, the cave paintings of primitive peoples remind us of the ancient symbolic importance of animals as modes of thought and belief. Klingender (1971) remarked in this regard, “the history of animal art must begin with the beginning of all art, for animals were the first subject to challenge the artistic faculties of men” (p. 3). Unfortunately, the conceptual significance of this finding, as well as the impact of domestication some 10,000 years ago, have only been lightly considered by the great majority of social theorists and researchers. One might postulate that the dearth of such investigation is, in itself, a social statement on a society regarded by some as particularly anthropocentric and detached from considerations of human relatedness and dependence on the nonhuman world.

Keywords

Income Marketing Hunt Fishing Defend 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen R. Kellert
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Forestry and Environmental StudiesYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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