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Pathophysiology of Volume Regulation and Sodium Metabolism

  • Elsa Bello-Reuss

Abstract

The human body contains approximately 60 mEq of Na per kg. As illustrated in Figure 1, in a 70-kg individual this represents a total body Na content of 4200 mEq. About 40%–45% of total body Na (~1800 mEq) is contained in bone. Of the remaining 2400 mEq, about 2100 mEq are contained in the extracellular fluid (ECF) and only about 300 mEq are contained in the intracellular fluid (ICF) of soft tissues. About 70% of total body Na is exchangeable. The remaining 30% is most likely adsorbed to hydroxyapatite crystals in long bones. Exchangeable Na, therefore, includes all of the Na contained in the ECF and ICF of soft tissues, and a fraction of the Na present in bone. Exchangeable Na is in dynamic equilibrium with ECF Na, and represents a reservoir that can in part compensate for decreases of ECF Na concentration.

Keywords

Proximal Tubule Renal Blood Flow Renin Secretion Sodium Balance Sodium Depletion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elsa Bello-Reuss
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine, and Physiology and BiophysicsWashington University School of Medicine and The Jewish Hospital of St. LouisSt. LouisUSA

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