Content and Structure in Moral Development: A Crucial Distinction

  • Diane I. Levande
Part of the Child Nurturance book series (CHILDNUR, volume 1)

Abstract

Studies of moral development in the Piaget and Kohlberg tradition have been the subject of growing and challenging debate as evidenced by the presentations today. Philosophers attack Kohlberg’s particular brand of philosophical reasoning. For example, R. S. Peters (1976) criticizes Kohlberg for his reluctance to consider other philosophical systems by suggesting that Kohlberg simply does not do his homework. At the same time it is not unheard of for some philosophers to allow that Kohlberg’s abilities as a social scientist, especially as a researcher, may really be quite good.

Keywords

Income 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane I. Levande
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social WorkMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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