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Behavioral Treatment of Outpatient Problem Drinkers

Five Clinical Case Studies
  • Nora E. Noel
  • Linda C. Sobell
  • Tony Cellucci
  • Ted D. Nirenberg
  • Mark B. Sobell

Abstract

For years the field of alcoholism has been influenced by traditional concepts of alcohol dependence (Pattison, Sobell, & Sobell, 1977). Consequently, treatment interventions have focused primarily on alcohol abusers who are physically dependent on alcohol (gamma alcoholics). Most treatment has also been of an inpatient or residential nature and has focused exclusively on abstinence, rarely addressing other areas of life or health functioning. In the last decade, however, epidemiologic studies have suggested that chronic alcoholics represent only a small proportion of those who have serious drinking problems, and that the number of individuals whose drinking behavior is problematic and high risk, but who are not physically addicted, is quite large (Cahalan & Room, 1974).

Keywords

Drinking Behavior Therapy Session Problem Drinker Pure Ethanol Couple Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Author, 1980.Google Scholar
  2. Cahalan, D., & Room, R. Problem drinking among American men. Monograph of the Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies, No. 7, 1974.Google Scholar
  3. Pattison, E. M., Sobell, M. B., & Sobell, L. C. Emerging concepts of alcohol dependence. New York: Springer, 1977.Google Scholar
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  8. Sobell, L. C., Sobell, M. B., & Nirenberg, T. Differential treatment planning. In E. M. Pattison & E. Kaufman (Eds.), The American handbook of alcoholism. New York: Gardner Press, 1982.Google Scholar
  9. Sobell, M. B., & Sobell, L. C. Behavioral treatment of alcohol problems: Individualized therapy and controlled drinking. New York: Plenum Press, 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nora E. Noel
    • 1
  • Linda C. Sobell
    • 2
  • Tony Cellucci
    • 3
  • Ted D. Nirenberg
    • 4
  • Mark B. Sobell
    • 2
  1. 1.Problem Drinkers ProjectButler HospitalProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Institute, Addiction Research FoundationUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  3. 3.North Carolina Wesleyan CollegeRocky MountUSA
  4. 4.Veterans Administration Medical CenterProvidenceUSA

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