The Djenkol Bean

  • Khin Kyi Nyunt

Abstract

The botanical name for this starchy legume is Pithecollobium lobatum. The English common name is the djenkol bean. However, nutritionists know it by the more descriptive name of Ape’s Earring, djonkol, or stink-bean. The Burmese name is da-nyin-thee. It grows on a tall tree of the Mimosa family. Its fruit pods are horseshoe shaped or spirally twisted. It flowers from January to April and fruits appear from August to October. The djenkol bean is popular in most countries of southeast Asia, wherever it flourishes—in Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia.

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References

  1. Food and Agriculture Organization, 1972, Food Composition for Use in East Asia, U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institute of Health, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Khin Kyi Nyunt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical ResearchNutrition Research DivisionRangoonBurma

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