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Designing Behavioral Technologies with Community Self-Help Organizations

  • Stephen B. Fawcett
  • R. Kay Fletcher
  • Paula L. Whang
  • Tom Seekins
  • Louise Merola Nielsen
  • R. Mark Mathews

Abstract

Attempts to bring about improvements in communities, or to enhance the functioning and well-being of their individual members, are laden with assumptions about the causes of problems and the mechanisms of change. Similarly, several assumptions are implicit in a strategy to contribute to social change efforts through the development of behavioral technologies for community self-help organizations. It is assumed that the problems of living experienced by many individuals in society may be a function of such fundamental social problems as poverty and power-lessness (Ryan, 1971a). If the causes lie outside the person in the broader social system, to treat problems of adjustment and coping individual by individual is to “blame the victim” for problems in society (Ryan, 1971b). Thus efforts to prevent problems of living in individuals might focus on improving the capacities of society’s various community support groups to promote individual functioning and human fulfillment (Kessler & Albee, 1975).

Keywords

Community Mental Health Community Organization Community Psychology Apply Behavior Analysis Social Service Agency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen B. Fawcett
    • 1
  • R. Kay Fletcher
    • 1
  • Paula L. Whang
    • 1
  • Tom Seekins
    • 1
  • Louise Merola Nielsen
    • 1
  • R. Mark Mathews
    • 2
  1. 1.Community Technology Project, Center for Public AffairsUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HawaiiHiloUSA

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