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Trajectories as Two-Dimensional Probability Fields

  • Perry J. Samson
  • Jennie L. Moody
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 1)

Abstract

The diagnoses of air pollution episodes involving regional-scale transport has been aided by the use of trajectory analysis. This analysis involves the use of interpolation from observed or computed winds to estimate either the path of air parcels leaving a source region or the path traversed by air sampled at a receptor location. This analysis has provided valuable qualitative insight into the nature of regional-scale transport.

Keywords

Source Region Probability Field Trajectory Analysis Contribution Field NOAA Tech 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Perry J. Samson
    • 1
  • Jennie L. Moody
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic ScienceThe University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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