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Delinquency

  • Stanley L. Brodsky
  • H. O’Neal Smitherman
Part of the Perspectives in Law & Psychology book series (MPIE)

Abstract

The scales in this chapter are concerned with delinquency and delinquents. This topic includes the social process by which youths become delinquents, the extent and severity of their delinquent acts, and the societal reaction to those acts. Thus, one scale is included that evaluates the juvenile probation officer’s punitive reaction to a youthful probationer’s law violation.

Keywords

Delinquent Behavior Juvenile Delinquency Behavior Category Police Contact Miranda Warning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley L. Brodsky
    • 1
  • H. O’Neal Smitherman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  2. 2.Partlow State SchoolTuscaloosaUSA

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