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Experimental Animal Models for Anaerobic Infections

  • A. B. Onderdonk
  • D. L. Kasper
  • B. J. Mansheim
  • T. J. Louie
  • S. L. Gorbach
  • J. G. Bartlett

Abstract

The role of obligate anaerobes in serious infection has received increasing attention over the past several years. Initially, little was known about many of these microbes except that they were commonly found in certain infections and that they were the dominant components of the colonic microflora. Clinical studies often failed to document the pathogenic role of anaerobes because they were usually found in combination with aerobes at infected sites. Subsequent research has employed animal models to determine the pathogenic potential of anaerobic bacteria. This approach is particularly attractive because, unlike clinical studies, the investigations can be conducted under controlled conditions.

Keywords

Abscess Formation Experimental Animal Model Capsular Polysaccharide Barium Sulfate Viable Cell Density 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. Onderdonk
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • D. L. Kasper
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • B. J. Mansheim
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • T. J. Louie
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. L. Gorbach
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. G. Bartlett
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Infectious Disease Research LaboratoryVeterans Administration HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineTufts University School of MedicineUSA
  3. 3.the Channing Laboratory and the Department of MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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