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The Relationship Between the Periodontal Microflora and Alveolar Bone Loss in Macaca Arctoides

  • Jørgen Slots
  • Ernest Hausmann
  • Christian Mouton
  • Lance F. Ortman
  • Paulette G. Hammond
  • Robert J. Genco

Abstract

Several investigators have studied intensively for the last five years the subgingival microflora associated with various clinical entities of human periodontal disease (13,16). These studies have all been cross-sectional in nature. Although of considerable interest, the available data cannot provide information as to whether an organism initiates, contributes to the progression of, or is secondary to the pathological changes.

Keywords

Periodontal Disease Alveolar Bone Dental Plaque Periodontal Pocket Alveolar Bone Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jørgen Slots
    • 1
  • Ernest Hausmann
    • 1
  • Christian Mouton
    • 1
  • Lance F. Ortman
    • 1
  • Paulette G. Hammond
    • 1
  • Robert J. Genco
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oral Biology and Periodontal Disease Clinical Research CenterState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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