One and Two Dimensional Solids as Possible Models for Biological Compounds

  • J. P. Farges

Abstract

This contribution will address aspects of 1D and 2D systems, their interaction with the external world, the role of impurities, structural defects, disorder and coulombic correlation. Fluctuations are shown to be important in 1D and 2D systems, i.e., no phase transitions occur in 1D. Membranes should be examined in terms of bi- or multi-layers. Electronic superconductivity is discussed in terms of the 1D Little model and its biological implications. The 2D Ginzburg model and actual layered superconductors are also discussed. Structured instabilities are fundamentally important in bio-molecules.

Keywords

Anisotropy Graphite Hydrocarbon Molybdenum Photosynthesis 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. P. Farges
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de BiophysiqueU.E.R.D.M., Université de Nice/ValroseNice CedexFrance

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