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Establishment of Fluent Speech in Stutterers

  • Ronald L. Webster

Abstract

Stuttering (or stammering, as it is sometimes known) is a distinctive form of behavior involving anomalous movements of laryngeal and vocal tract motor systems during attempts to produce speech. The repetition of sounds, syllables and words, the apparent “sticking” on a sound, and the blockage of voice during attempts to initiate speech are among the more discriminable physical features of stuttering.

Keywords

Auditory Feedback Therapy Program Voice Onset Time Tension Control Fluent Speech 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald L. Webster
    • 1
  1. 1.Hollins Communications Research InstituteHollins CollegeRoanokeUSA

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