Metallographic Quality Control of Orthopaedic Implants

  • G. Hamman
  • D. I. Bardos

Abstract

Metallography plays a significant role in the quality control of metal alloys used in the manufacture of orthopaedic surgical implants. Metallographic examination of raw materials prior to the fabrication of implant devices helps assure that the devices will be safe and effective when used in the treatment of orthopaedic patients. In most instances, the devices must have adequate mechanical strength, fatigue strength, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. While it is not possible to predict the clinical performance of materials by microstructural analysis alone, metallography does serve to relate the clinically-observed performances of materials to the metallurgical characteristics of the raw materials. This paper highlights the important aspects of this relationship as observed during many years of examining thousands of devices.

Keywords

Fatigue Titanium Porosity Nickel Sulfide 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Hamman
    • 1
  • D. I. Bardos
    • 2
  1. 1.ZimmerUSA
  2. 2.WarsawUSA

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