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Prospects for Farming the Open Ocean

  • Howard A. Wilcox
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 14)

Abstract

Presently visualized prospects for farming the open oceans of the earth are based mainly on the results of an activity called the Ocean Food & Energy Farm Project (1). This project, conceived and initiated by the U.S. Navy in late 1972 and terminated in late 1976, was composed of scientists and engineers of the Navy, the California Institute of Technology, the Western Regional Research Center of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Institute of Gas Technology in Chicago, and a number of other individuals and organizations, all working together under the joint sponsorship of the Navy, the National Science Foundation, the American Gas Association, and the United States Energy Research and Development Administration. It was aimed at developing methods and systems which would hopefully be both technically and economically successful for using the vast surface waters of the open oceans to raise, harvest, and convert seaweeds (“kelp”), plus associated fish and other organisms, into goods for man.

Keywords

Anaerobic Digestion Open Ocean Mooring Line Farm Unit Giant Kelp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard A. Wilcox
    • 1
  1. 1.Naval Ocean Systems CenterSan DiegoUSA

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