Vibrational Excitation II: Classical and Semiclassical Methods

  • W. Ronald Gentry

Abstract

In this chapter we consider methods for calculating cross sections or rates for vibrational energy transfer in which at least one degree of freedom in the collision system is treated classically. We ignore cases in which electronic transitions or electronically nonadiabatic effects play an important role, but we do include methods for treating simultaneous vibrational and rotational transitions, since the two are often coupled strongly in real systems. The literature on classical and semiclassical treatments of vibrational energy transfer is immense. Because of the special nature of this volume as a “consumers handbook” designed to be of practical rather than of pedagogical value, no attempt has been made here to be comprehensive in scope or historical in perspective.* Instead we focus on those aspects of the theory which at present appear to be the most useful in the interpretation of modern experimental data. Our chief criterion for usefulness is the degree of success with which a given method has actually been applied to the interpretation of experimental results. However, in some cases the lack of appropriate data precludes comparison with experiment, and the value of a given approach must be judged by the available comparisons with other theoretical results.

Keywords

Anisotropy Attenuation Recombination Iodine Helium 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Ronald Gentry
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Dynamics Laboratory, Department of ChemistryUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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