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Perception of Residential Crowding, Classroom Experiences, and Student Health

  • Daniel Stokols
  • Walter Ohlig
  • Susan M. Resnik

Abstract

A core concern of environmental design research is the impact of the physical and social environment on human health and behavior. Professional designers often approach this issue through direct observation of the relationships between architectural variables and behavioral patterns. Design-oriented behavioral scientists, while sharing designers’ concern with the direct linkages between objective environments and overt behaviors, more commonly approach the environment-behavior interface by way of theoretical, or intervening constructs. These constructs help to specify the social and physical conditions under which specific features of the physical environment might correlate with various types of behavior.

Keywords

Residential Environment Social Climate Student Health Residential Evaluation Semantic Differential Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Stokols
    • 1
  • Walter Ohlig
    • 1
  • Susan M. Resnik
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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