Advertisement

Dimensions of Social Life Style in Multiple Dwelling Housing

  • Robert J. Beck
  • Pierre Teasdale

Abstract

This paper is an inquiry into selected dimensions of the social lifestyle of 75 French-Canadian and English-Canadian families inhabiting multiple dwelling housing in 4 cities in Eastern Canada. Our purpose was to investigate the way in which the physical environment was implicated in the initiation, development and sustenance of several kinds of social lifestyle variables including activities (e.g., visits), relationships (e.g., friendships), values (e.g., privacy attitudes toward neighbors), community image (perceived solidarity), personality and several others. The study examines such behavior with respect to cultural and family demographic variations in the sample which consisted uniquely of whole families with 2–3 young children. An in-depth methodology consisting of a 115-question interview, furniture maps, field notes, observation and photographs was used with the families to generate criteria for government standards for user program requirements in Canadian housing. Distinct cultural and family type differences and preferences are noted which have implications for the design of multiple dwelling housing. The work also sheds light on the empirical study of privacy and its relationship to other dimensions of social life.

Keywords

Social Relation Social Life Family Type Housing Project Good Neighbor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Altman, E. Privacy: A conceptual analysis. In S. T. Margulis (ed.) Privacy, Part 6, Proceedings of the Fifth Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association, Milwaukee, 1974.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Beck, R. J., Rowan, R. and Teasdale, P. The evaluation of family satisfaction with the design of the stacked maisonette. In C. Lozar (ed.) Methods and Measures, Part 5, Proceedings of the Fifth Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association, Milwaukee, 1974.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Beck, R., Rowan, R. and Teasdale, P. Phase 1 Report. Ottawa: Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 1974.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Becker, F. D. The effect of physical and social factors on residents’ sense of security in multi-family housing developments. Journal of Architectural Research, 1975, 4: 18–24.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Carey, L. and Mapes, R. The Sociology of Planning. London: B. T. Batsford, 1972.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Margulis, S. T, Privacy as a behavioral phenomenon: coming of age. In S. T. Margulis (ed.) Privacy, Part 6, Proceedings of the Fifth Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association, Milwaukee, 1974.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Perin, C. With Man in Mind. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1972.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Wolfe, M. and Laufer, R. The concept of privacy in childhood and adolescence. In S. T. Margulis (ed.) Privacy, Part 6, Proceedings of the Fifth Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association, Milwaukee, 1974.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Beck
    • 1
  • Pierre Teasdale
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de recherches et d’innovation urbainesUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada

Personalised recommendations