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Privacy Regulation in Public Bathrooms: Verbal and Nonverbal Behaviour

  • Michael G. Efran
  • Charles S. Baran

Abstract

There are two ways to study man-environment relations. One is to bring the environment into the laboratory and the other is to bring the laboratory out into the environment. On the principle that it is easier to bring Mohammed to the mountain than it is the mountain to Mohammed, the later alternative was taken and the studies reported here were conducted within a series of public mens rooms located in a large university building. The building also houses classrooms, offices and other laboratories. This seemingly unlikely site was selected because the studies deal with the behavioural regulation of privacy and it seemed that, at least in North America, this location guaranteed privacy needs of an intense nature (though just why this should be so is somewhat of a mystery).

Keywords

Nonverbal Behaviour Privacy Regulation Distance Rule Park Bench Large American City 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael G. Efran
    • 1
  • Charles S. Baran
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Life SciencesUniversity of Toronto at Scarborough CollegeWest HillCanada

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