Occupational Stress Testing in the Real World

  • Wesley E. Sime
  • Bronston T. Mayes
  • Hermann Witte
  • Daniel Ganster
  • Gerald Tharp

Abstract

The role of emotional stress in the etiology of numerous chronic diseases has been clearly established (Hoiberg, 1982). Coronary heart disease, in particular, has the most profound accumulation of literature supporting the causal effect of emotional stress upon atherosclerotic changes, as well as signs and symptoms in the form of angina pectoris hypertension and coronary vasospasm (Eliot, 1979; Eliot and Sime, 1980). Numerous other studies have shown a relationship between emotional stress (measured in several different ways) with hypertension, irritable bowel syndrome (including ulcers and colitis), and Raynaud’s syndrome (Ford, 1982). Further evidence of the pathological consequences of emotional stress stems from the literature showing that quite a number of functional disorders are treated successfully with a variety of stress management interventions including biofeedback, progressive relaxation, and autogenic training.

Keywords

Depression Noradrenalin Smoke Adrenalin Catecholamine 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wesley E. Sime
    • 1
  • Bronston T. Mayes
    • 1
  • Hermann Witte
    • 1
  • Daniel Ganster
    • 1
  • Gerald Tharp
    • 1
  1. 1.University of NebraskaLincoln, OmahaUSA

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