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Problems in Correlating In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Drug Metabolism

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Abstract

No single approach for studying drug metabolism provides all the necessary information required for a complete understanding of the factors that govern the time courses of the concentrations of drugs and other foreign compounds and their metabolites in tissues of the body. Some of the factors are best studied with pure enzymes, while others are best studied with subcellular organelles, intact cells, intact organs or living animals. Well integrated programs encompassing all of these approaches are required if we are ever going to understand fully the metabolism of drugs by living animals and the ways by which pharmacokinetic characteristics may be altered. In order to make extrapolations between approaches, however, it is necessary to test data obtained by various approaches for consistency. Only in this way can we gain confidence that the conclusions derived fromin vitro experiments do indeed account for the events that occurin vivo.

Keywords

  • Intact Cell
  • Blood Flow Rate
  • Intrinsic Clearance
  • Study Drug Metabolism
  • Organ Clearance

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1984 Plenum Press, New York

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Gillette, J.R. (1984). Problems in Correlating In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Drug Metabolism. In: Benet, L.Z., Levy, G., Ferraiolo, B.L. (eds) Pharmacokinetics. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-2799-8_19

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-2799-8_19

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4612-9725-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4613-2799-8

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